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  1. In 1998, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) tested children nationwide for reading skills. The results for reading tests for 4th graders were:
        Below the most basic level   38%
        Proficient                          31%
        Advanced                           7%

    U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Educational Statistics. The Executive Summary of the 1998 National Assessment for Educational Progress Reading Report Card for the Nation, NCES 1999-50 (Washington, D.C.: March 1999).

  2. In 1998 there were ten million children between seven and eleven years of age who performed below the most basic level of reading achievement.

    Population Estimates Program, Population Division, U.S. Census Bureau Washington, D.C. 20233

  3. It is very important to note that a substantial number of children from highly literate households and who have been read to by their parents since very early in life also have difficulties learning to read.

    Lyon, G. Reid. "Report on Learning Disabilities Research." Prepared Statement to the Committee on Education and the Workforce. U.S. House of Representatives, APA Science Advocacy (July 10, 1997).

  4. In 1998, students who reported reading more pages daily in school and for homework had higher average scale scores than students who reported reading fewer pages daily.

    U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Educational Statistics. The Executive Summary of the 1998 National Assessment for Educational Progress Reading Report Card for the Nation (Washington, D.C.: March 1999).

  5. In 1998, students who reported watching three or fewer hours of television each day had higher average reading scores than students who reported watching more television.

    U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Educational Statistics. The Executive Summary of the 1998 National Assessment for Educational Progress Reading Report Card for the Nation (Washington, D.C.: March 1999).

  6. National Institute of Health studies are finding that at least 95% of even the poorest readers can learn to read at grade level if they are given proper instruction in sound-letter relationships.

    Lally, Kathy and Debbie M. Price. "Learning How We Read." Palm Beach Post, West Palm Beach, Florida (January 4, 1998): plA+.

  7. Having kids read a lot is one of the crucial components of becoming a good reader. Young readers need to become practiced at recognizing letters and sounds. The only way to get good at it is to practice.

    "Reading Research Read to Go." National Educational Association Today 17 no. 4 (Jan. 1999) 6

  8. The average reader spent about 6 minutes per day reading connected text. Children with reading problems spent about one minute per day. The amount of time students spent on worksheets did not relate to gains in reading achievement. What appeared to be most relevant was time spent reading connected print.

    Stahl, Steven A., Ann Duffy-Hester, et al. "Everything You Wanted to Know About Phonics (But Were Afraid to Ask.)" Reading Research Quarterly 33, no. 3 (July-September 1998):338-356.

  9. Four year old children who were read one alphabet book per day significantly improved in their awareness of phonemes - tiny letter sounds that make up words.

    Ibid.

  10. Children who struggle in vain with reading in the first grade soon decide that they neither like nor want to read. (Juel, 1998)

    National Research Council. Preventing Reading Difficulties in Young Children. Catherine Snow, Susan Burns, Peg Griffin, eds. (Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 1998).



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